theatlantic
theatlantic:

The Two Torontos

Toronto has hit the big time. I mean, when Ron Burgundy sings Loverboy’s “Working for the Weekend” on Conan in honor of Mayor Rob Ford, let’s just say T-dot is on the map. Sure, it’s for all the wrong reasons. But a shoutout on late-night American television can’t be ignored by the Canadian masses. My Facebook news feed runneth over.
Anyone who’s spent six minutes watching TV or browsing the Internet in the last few weeks has come across the Toronto mayor’s train wreck of a life: the admission to smoking crack; the invocation of a “drunken stupor” as an excuse for being high; the not having oral sex with a woman because he has “more than enough to eat at home”; his litany of apologetic non-apologies; and his national TV show with his doppelganger brother that lasted all of one episode. Now you can even hire a devil-worshiping comedy troupe in Toronto to take you on a bus tour of the most notorious sites in the crack-smoking scandal.
It would all be hilarious if it wasn’t so unseemly. And serious. There are ongoing allegations of domestic abuse and violence. The mayor appears to have an addiction problem. He also let a crack addict share a ride with his children while he himself was “out of it.” How often does that happen? Are those kids safe?
There’s been much handwringing about how Toronto got here. How did a city that’s one of the most diverse in the world end up with a mayor who makes both racist and homophobic comments? How did multicultural Toronto end up with a mayor who seems to revel in his lack of culture? How has Ford’s approval rating remained virtually unscathed, at 42 percent, as the scandal has metastasized?
Read more. [Image: Reuters/Aaron Harris]

theatlantic:

The Two Torontos

Toronto has hit the big time. I mean, when Ron Burgundy sings Loverboy’s “Working for the Weekend” on Conan in honor of Mayor Rob Ford, let’s just say T-dot is on the map. Sure, it’s for all the wrong reasons. But a shoutout on late-night American television can’t be ignored by the Canadian masses. My Facebook news feed runneth over.

Anyone who’s spent six minutes watching TV or browsing the Internet in the last few weeks has come across the Toronto mayor’s train wreck of a life: the admission to smoking crack; the invocation of a “drunken stupor” as an excuse for being high; the not having oral sex with a woman because he has “more than enough to eat at home”; his litany of apologetic non-apologies; and his national TV show with his doppelganger brother that lasted all of one episode. Now you can even hire a devil-worshiping comedy troupe in Toronto to take you on a bus tour of the most notorious sites in the crack-smoking scandal.

It would all be hilarious if it wasn’t so unseemly. And serious. There are ongoing allegations of domestic abuse and violence. The mayor appears to have an addiction problem. He also let a crack addict share a ride with his children while he himself was “out of it.” How often does that happen? Are those kids safe?

There’s been much handwringing about how Toronto got here. How did a city that’s one of the most diverse in the world end up with a mayor who makes both racist and homophobic comments? How did multicultural Toronto end up with a mayor who seems to revel in his lack of culture? How has Ford’s approval rating remained virtually unscathed, at 42 percent, as the scandal has metastasized?

Read more. [Image: Reuters/Aaron Harris]

First Vic Towes brought us #Vikileaks, now Peter Mackay is #PeepingPeter (Pic via @StephenLautens on Twitter)
New “Cyber-bullying” legislation introduced by the Harper government is gathering criticisms, with many saying that it is over reaching. Critics of the bill say it is similar to Bill C-30, which came under fire not only by the intrusive powers that it gave to police, but also by the rhetoric used by former Conservative MP Vic Towes in the house to promote the legislation (“you are either with us or the child pornographers”.)
The real shame is that Peter Mackay and the Conservatives have used the tragic deaths of two Canadian teens in order to bundle this bill with previous failed legislation that Canadians may find intrusive. The Conservatives have a majority, which they can use to pass any legislation they want. They don’t need to hide behind two dead teens or children who are bullied. By hiding their agenda in this way, it is little wonder that many Canadians suspect that they have a hidden agenda!
Watch a lawyers take on the new “Cyber-bullying” legislation.

First Vic Towes brought us #Vikileaks, now Peter Mackay is #PeepingPeter (Pic via @StephenLautens on Twitter)

New “Cyber-bullying” legislation introduced by the Harper government is gathering criticisms, with many saying that it is over reaching. Critics of the bill say it is similar to Bill C-30, which came under fire not only by the intrusive powers that it gave to police, but also by the rhetoric used by former Conservative MP Vic Towes in the house to promote the legislation (“you are either with us or the child pornographers”.)

The real shame is that Peter Mackay and the Conservatives have used the tragic deaths of two Canadian teens in order to bundle this bill with previous failed legislation that Canadians may find intrusive. The Conservatives have a majority, which they can use to pass any legislation they want. They don’t need to hide behind two dead teens or children who are bullied. By hiding their agenda in this way, it is little wonder that many Canadians suspect that they have a hidden agenda!

Watch a lawyers take on the new “Cyber-bullying” legislation.

RCMP lays out how the ‘Senate Scandal’ went down in their view.

I imagine the Prime Minister’s Office is trying to buy and deliver booze and drugs to Toronto Mayor Rob Ford in an effort to get the spotlight off of themselves.

These new allegations made by the Mounties are going to be ruff on the Prime Minister. CTV’s Robert Fife thinks these new allegations/revelations are serious enough to take Harper out!

Watch Bob Fife on CTV’s Power Play

Also read the timeline by Canadian Press, "Anatomy of a scandal: key developments in history of the Senate expenses saga"